Russia Will Not Save Greece

Here we are again. As I write this, Eurozone Finance Ministers are meeting with their Greek counterparts to attempt to hash out an agreement for an extension on their next loan repayment in order to keep the banks open and narrowly avoid default. Play time is over: both François Hollande and Angela Merkel telephoned Greek […]

US-Russia Relations: ‘It’s Not Me, It’s You’

For very obvious reasons, relations aren’t so great between the United States and Russia lately. But what’s interesting is that both sides prefer to blame the other side for causing the deterioration in relations, while keeping a door open for a friendship down the road if only the other side would get their act together. […]

How Much Does Russia’s Troll Army Cost?

The New York Times Magazine has published a translation of an interesting blog post by Anton Nossik, responding to Adrian Chen’s amazing in-depth investigation into one of the Russian government’s most ambitious Internet troll operations. Nossik raises an important question – aside from the national security concerns posed by this sort of aggressive propaganda campaign, […]

Edward Snowden and the Strategy of Tension

It has been a little more than two years since the whistleblower Edward Snowden’s first leaks of classified National Security Agency (NSA) documents revealing unchecked mass surveillance practices by the U.S. government, and it is safe to say that we now live in a totally different world. The core questions first raised by the Snowden […]

Thai Lawyers Demand Justice Following Arrests of Protesters

As readers of this blog will know, 22nd May marked the 1st anniversary of Thailand’s most recent military coup d’etat. To mark this anniversary, groups of Thai students around the country engaged in civil disobedience and protest against the military regime. In typical fashion the Thai military reacted with draconian brutality, beating and arresting 38 students. […]

One Year After the Coup, Thailand Languishes in Darkness

The Thai military coup of May 22nd 2014 had been months, if not years, in the making. Ever since PM Yingluck Shinawatra’s landslide election win in July 2011, it had been clear – to all those who were willing to see – that the Thai people’s genuine commitment to democracy was doomed to be usurped […]

Abhisit’s Shameful Responsibility for the 2010 Bangkok Massacre

It was five years ago on May 19th 2010 that 100s of unarmed Thai pro-democracy protesters sought refuge in one of central Bangkok’s most famous temples – Wat Pathum. They had gone there under the promise from the Thai authorities that the temple was a designated safe haven and to escape the snipers and soldiers […]

Why We Will Never Forget the Human Rights Crimes of the Thai Army

If there is one characteristic that defines Abhisit Vejjajiva’s baleful Democrat Party-led Thai government of 2008 to 2011, it is its shocking and callous disregard for human life during the Bangkok Massacre of 2010. As my law firm has reiterated time and time again, setting highly trained snipers, equipped with the latest battlefield military hardware, […]

Thailand’s Junta Must Not Be Allowed to Distort Historical Memory

“Those who control the present, control the past and those who control the past control the future” In the late 1960s and early 1970s the Thai Army were engaged in a fierce struggle with the Communist Party of Thailand (CPT) for control of the country. Vast swathes of the kingdom were under the jurisdiction of […]

Questions for Austria Following the Stephan Templ Case

By Robert Amsterdam and Claire Kerschensteiner Stephan Templ’s conviction for serious fraud and his original sentence of three years imprisonment, now reduced to one, for damaging the Republic of Austria is an embarrassment for the country. To indict, convict and jail somebody for filling out an application form ‘incorrectly’ makes no sense. The restitution process, […]